The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett – My first visit to Discworld

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My first and only experience with the Discworld series, until today, was through the point and click adventures of Discworld, Discworld II and Discworld Noir on the PlayStation, and even though I enjoyed them, I never ventured to the paperbacks.

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Fortunately, due to a newfound dependency on audiobooks to ease the weekly commutes, I’ve been visiting all of the great literary sagas that I’ve never had the chance to check out or finish; from Iain M Banks’ Culture Saga, to Stephen King’s Watchtower Series, to some of the more popular runs; like George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones run, I’ll be taking advantage of them all. Today was my first ever run in with Pratchett, and my first real attempt at fantasy. Until audiobooks, anything that wasn’t non-fiction or military, or gangster related, (or both, or all) was put to one side and deemed “not for me”.

If you haven’t tried audiobooks; the fact that it pushes you to try stuff you typically wouldn’t be willing to invest time in warrants it enough. They may cost more, but the convenience more than makes up for it. If you’re strapped for cash, Audible offer 1 free credit as a trial and currently have 3 additional credits on sale at ¬£18. A credit grants you a full download of any of their audiobooks and the thriftier buyers will notice you can pick up things like the complete works of Shakespeare and the 63 hour long 30th edition of Atlas Shrugged for a single credit; providing you with literally days of listening time in a single hit, for a fraction of the price.

Anyway! onto The Colour of Magic…

This is the first of Pratchetts books in the enormous Discworld series; which describes the events of a world, on a disc, on the back of a pack of elephants, on a turtle…which is floating through space, to a location undetermined. Discworld has now spanned 3 decades and 40 novels, snatching up awards and bundles of critical acclaim along the way.

The version that I picked up was a spritely 7 hours long and narrated by Nigel Planer, who does a great job at getting hold of all of Pratchett’s complicated, imaginary vocabulary. A semi-downside of the Nigel Planer version is that it sounds a lot like it has been ported from an old cassette version. You can hear the subtle, magnetic squeal of digital synthesis in the background and the volume, and even general mastering of the audio track varies from chapter to chapter; which can be obnoxiously¬†jarring when you’re caught up in the story. It does, however give it the retro feel of an 80’s novel though, which is probably as close to the feeling of picking up a tattered, much-read, beloved book as you can get with an audio track…so maybe it’s something to be embraced.

As with any longstanding series, the first book comes across as a little bit wet behind the ears, which will surely buff out as the series carries on. Despite it being an introductory novel, of sorts, it actually does a great job of introducing you to the concept of Discworld and the physics, lore and jargon that surrounds it. Rather than explaining everything that’s unique to the realm of Discworld, Pratchett refreshingly describes things as though you’re one of its inhabitants and that you should already get the gist. This may sound daunting, but it actually serves the fantasy really well and makes all of the new feel much less of a struggle.

Rincewind, the main protagonist, is painted well as the last person that should be playing the hero, but someone who is unwillingly thrust into situations beyond his ken; and you’re encouraged to feast upon his misfortune throughout, with some hilarious perforations from his unwanted, scythe-wielding onlooker.

It’s a brilliant combination of Sci-Fi and Fantasy, and something that clearly inspired the likes of Riyria Chronicles and the Wizard’s Choice digital gamebooks that I recently reviewed. I feel slightly guilty that I’m so late to the party…hopefully I’ll be caught up soon…39 to go!

Assassin’s Tweed

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There’s a bunch of April Fool’s jokes hopping around the Twitterverse today, but one of them has got me thinking…

Geek-Chic company, Insert Coin posted a teaser of their Assassin’s Creed “Formal Range” today, which instantly sparked the idea of a Sherlock Holmes-themed AC sequel.

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I’ll set the scene:

It’s the late 1800’s, and you’re Animus’d into the life of detective, drug addict and bare-knuckled boxer, Sherlock Holmes, who has found, through one of his investigations, the hints of Templar tomfoolery. You climb and fight your way through the smoggy, cobbled alleyways of Old London Town, collecting clues, fighting crime, and encountering some of the key characters of 19th century Britain, from Jack the Ripper, Charles DIckens, and of course, Professor James Moriarty.

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A similarly themed adventure was plotted out in the classic, Mike Mignola (creator of Hellboy) interpretation of a 19th century Batman, Gotham by Gaslight, where Bruce Wayne tracks down Jack the Ripper in one of the DC “ElseWorld” style universes. The fact that rooftop-dweller, Batman can animate such a setting proves that it’s more than fitting for an Assassin, and the cityscapes would be simply staggering.

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I must admit; I’m not too bothered (yet) about the French Revolution themed sequel in the works. Personally, like many, I was hoping for a traditional, Japanese samurai variant, but if I can’t get that, Olde London Town will do.